Thursday, March 29, 2012

How to Easily "Cut" Glass Jars

You find the coolest things on Pinterest. As with much of the crafting and design worlds, I am semi-addicted to Pinterest. I put the "semi" in there because I only go on the site a few times a week. Purposely. Because otherwise I'd spend a huge majority of time I don't have wandering around and pinning everything in sight.

If you haven't checked it out yet, you really should. Technically you need to sign up for an invite, but nowadays they're letting people in pretty quickly. And if you do find yourself hugely impatient to open the wonderland that is Pinterest, leave me a comment with your email address and I'll send you an invite. For those of you already on, you can follow me or feel free to leave a comment with your Pinterest link for us to check out.

The whole reason for that schpiel was this awesome video I found on Pinterest today on how to "cut" (break cleanly) a glass bottle or jar - using regular household items. No joke! String, nail polish remover (acetone), and a sink. And matches. Because yes, you get to play with fire and water. I'm going to have to try this just for that. Add to that the fact that the music on the video is Oingo Boingo, and how could I not share this video?!

Friday, January 20, 2012

Let's Talk Coffee

1/365: jan 1 First off, I'm sure you (all two of you!) thought I'd abandoned this blog, but I promise, I have not! One of my resolutions this year is to actually post about the things I've been busy making.

So let's dive into one of my favorite worlds - coffee. I'm pretty passionate about my coffee. It's something that's developed over time, my tastebuds gaining a love of stronger and purer coffee bit-by-bit. I get a lot of compliments on my coffee (hey, it's not bragging if it's fact!), and people asking what my secret is. But it's really not a secret. It's just the right choices in equipment and coffee storage. I will warn you now, this may be too high-maintenance and costly for some of you. It's worth it to me, but if that doesn't sound like you, you can skip the rest of this post.


Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Cooking Class

Jordan shows us how to plate our crudo
It may not have escaped your attention that I love to bake. Cooking, however, I leave to my husband most of the time, as he's developed a passion for it over the past few years. So as his birthday loomed closer and closer and I had no idea what present to give him, I finally came up with the idea of going to a cooking class.

As usual, I turned to the wisdom of the Internet and found a few local chefs that had one-time classes within our budget. And after weighing a plethora of reviews, menu choices, and schedule, I decided on Jordan Schachter's class through Jordan's Kitchen. Seriously, I don't think I've ever seen someone with so many 5-star ratings on Yelp. Plus, his 4-course menus looked amazing, like something we'd be fairly likely to cook again, and the reviews talked about how down-to-earth and practical his teaching methods were. Sounded perfect.

The hubby was thrilled when I told him about his present, and even though I felt a little like I was gifting myself at the same time, I had decided to go along. This way we could enjoy an evening together, as well as being able to both learn from the class and cull our experiences when back in our own kitchen. See, I may not cook very often, but it doesn't mean I can't. My more common role these days is chief taster and feedback-giver for the hubby's creations. But I'm also good for helping him pair flavors, seasonings, and leading him away from less edible experiments.

We (impatiently) waited the few weeks until the class, re-reading the menu and trying not to drool in anticipation. We would be making four courses over four hours:
- King Salmon crudo, quick pickled cucumbers, radishes and black sesame
- Sweet chilled corn soup with wild shrimp and chive flowers
- Chicken thighs with housemade BBQ sauce, summer squash and goat cheese gratin
- Baked peaches in Riesling with mint, blueberries and whipped crème fraiche

Friday, May 27, 2011

CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)

When I first heard the acronym CSA, I thought someone was talking about accounting. But it's actually something much more interesting - Community Supported Agriculture. Basically, it's a group that works with local farms to offer you fresh produce, and sometimes meat and dairy items as well.

CSAs are something a friend of mine in Seattle introduced me to, and then I really got interested in when my sisters started an email conversation about them in the Bay Area. I'd heard a lot of great things about the freshness of the produce, but what they didn't like was not knowing what they were getting every time, and consistently getting uncommon produce that they didn't know how to cook, or didn't necessarily like.

So when I looked around at options that served our little beach town, I was very excited to find a company that offered you the ability to choose what you wanted every week by filling out the order form online. Perfect. I get to change my mind every week, and I get to do it online. It didn't take much to convince my cooking hobbyist husband that we wanted fresh produce every week, so we signed up for the trial of 4 weeks. That was 4 months ago.